Blood-induced joint damage: a canine in vivo study

G. Roosendaal, J. M. TeKoppele, M. E. Vianen, H. M. van den Berg, F. P. Lafeber, J. W. Bijlsma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

To investigate the direct and indirect (via synovial inflammation) effects of intraarticular bleeding on cartilage in vivo. Right knees of 14 beagle dogs were injected with autologous blood on days 0 and 2. Cartilage matrix proteoglycan turnover, collagen damage, and synovial inflammation of these knees, including the cartilage-destructive properties of the synovial tissue, were determined and compared with those of the left control knees on day 4 (short-term effects; n = 7) and day 16 (long-term effects; n = 7). Injected knees had a diminished content of proteoglycans in the cartilage matrix, and release of proteoglycans was enhanced (days 4 and 16). The synthesis of proteoglycans was significantly inhibited on day 4 but was enhanced on day 16. On day 4 more collagen was denatured in the injected joint than in the control joint; this effect was no longer detectable on day 16. Synovial tissue showed signs of inflammation on day 4 and day 16 but had cartilage-destructive properties only on day 16. In vivo exposure of articular cartilage to blood for a relatively short time results in lasting changes in chondrocyte activity and in cartilage matrix integrity, changes that may predict lasting joint damage over time. Interestingly, the direct effect of blood on cartilage precedes the indirect effect via synovial inflammation
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1033-1039
JournalArthritis and rheumatism
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

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