Sickness absence due to mental health disorders--a societal perspective

C. A. M. Roelen, W. van Rhenen, P. C. Koopmans, U. Bültmann, J. W. Groothoff, J. J. L. van der Klink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Sickness absence (SA) is affected by societal factors. Increasing socioeconomic stress may cause or worsen mental health disorders, which are among the most frequent causes of SA. Employees may also be more cautious about being absent, for example in times of poor economy. To monitor the incidence of SA due to mental health disorders in the Netherlands from 2001 to 2010. Descriptive observational study of long-term (> 3 weeks) SA available from an occupational health service register. The incidence of both total and mental health long-term SA in each year was calculated and evaluated alongside the changes in SA compensation policies, gross national product and national unemployment statistics. The incidence of mental health SA was stratified based on the economic (agricultural, industrial, private, public) sector. The incidence of both total and mental health SA decreased gradually since 2004, and fell during the economic recession in 2009 in all economic sectors, particularly the agricultural and industrial sectors. The incidence of mental health SA increased with preliminary economic recovery in 2010 in the private and public sectors, but not in the agricultural and industrial sectors. Long-term SA due to mental health disorders has decreased since 2004, but further studies across countries are required to confirm and explain this trend
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)379-381
JournalOccupational medicine (Oxford, England)
Volume62
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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